Awarded Films 2017

Shooting Ourselves

Christine Cynn, Norway, 2015, 87′

Jury mention: The jury, consisting of Dr. Penelope Haralambidou, Ollie Alsop and Daniel Schwartz, describes the film as a clever and well executed recording of people’s perspectives on violence and war. In the film, these narratives are re-told in re-created spaces, and the result is a powerful piece of both theatre, film and architecture. Risky aesthetic decisions come together in a masterful way, leading the viewer on an emotional journey where memory and architecture is interconnected. The jury found Shooting Ourselves to be a complex and extraordinary piece of work

Synopsis: How does the arms trade impact real people? Christine Cynn’s Shooting Ourselves examines the weapons industry through the personal stories of victims, soldiers, manufacturers and activists from around the world, as they participate in an immersive production by the award-winning theatre company Rimini Protokoll, set in an architecture reconstructed from their everyday lives in the arms trade.

Construction Lines

Max Colson, UK, 2017, 8′

Jury mention: The jury, consisting of Dr. Penelope Haralambidou, Ollie Alsop and Daniel Schwartz, was impressed by how the filmmaker use primary sources – letters and voices – to build a crescendo out of seemly nothing: the complaints on a building development in central London. Construction Lines engages with the idea of architecture as the result of desire, and Colson’s use of architectural visualization tools play with these ideas in an interesting and witty way. The jury found Construction Lines to be both clever and memorable.

Synopsis: Construction Lines is a short-animated film exploring the spaces and lifestyles contained within an ‘iceberg’ home (where sub-ground levels are larger than the house above).

Five Lives of the Bradbury Building

Jasper Stevens, UK, 2016, 3′

Jury mention: Jurors Ollie Alsop and Daniel Schwartz was impressed by the way that Five Lives of the Bradbury Building shows a deep infusion of architecture and film. The film is based upon an interesting idea and engages with this idea in a very intriguing manner. Stevens’ use of architectural visualization tools to engage with the cinematic history of the building is well done and experimental, resulting in a film that also manages to be appropriately short. The jury describes the film as a well-executed and good-looking film, which is about both architecture and film.

Synopsis: Reconstructing the iconic Bradbury Building through five of it’s myriad narrative existences (Blade Runner, The Artist, D.O.A., 500 Days of Summer, The Indestructible Man), Five Lives of the Bradbury Building inhabits the viewpoint of “The Private Eye”, able to travel outside of traditional spatial constraints to view the multiple co-existent and contradictory narrative spaces simultaneously.

24h Dahlem

Clara Jo, Germany, 2016, 17′

Jury mention: The jury, consisting of Dr. Penelope Haralambidou, Ollie Alsop and Daniel Schwartz, found 24h Dahlem to be both a wonderful and excellent film. Jo uses her camera to engage with the relocation of the ethnographic collections of the Dahlem museum in Berlin and impresses the jury in the way that she manages to capture tactility and materiality, appropriate to the subject matter. In her film, the camera is not only an eye, but also touch. The jury describes 24h Dahlem as artful, delicate and sensual.

Synopsis: 24h Dahlem examines the motivations behind, and consequences of, the planned relocation (2019) of the ethnographic collections from the Dahlem State Museums—the Ethnological Museum and Museum for Asian Art—on the periphery of Berlin to the future site of the Humboldt Forum in Berlin Mitte. The film moves through the different layers of the museum, revealing that which is otherwise unseen.